Local piezoelectric and magnetic properties of (Bi0.88Gd0.12)FeO3 ceramics

1. Anja Mirjanić, Electronic Ceramics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia 2 , Slovenia
2. Uroš Prah, Electronic Ceramics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia 2 , Slovenia
3. Julian Walker, Department of Material Science and Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trond, Norway
4. Oana Condurache, Electronic Ceramics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia 2 , Slovenia
5. Andreja Benčan, Electronic Ceramics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia 2 , Slovenia
6. Tadej Rojac, Electronic Ceramics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia 2 , Slovenia
7. Marian Grigoras, National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, Lasi, Romania, Romania
8. Hana Uršič, Electronic Ceramics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia 2 , Slovenia

For more than two decades, bismuth ferrite (BFO) has been a central material for fundamental multiferroics research, primarly because its intrinsic room-temperature multiferroicity, characterized by a spontaneous ferroelectric polarization along the [111]pc with a Curie temperature of 825°C and G-type antiferromagnetic order with a Néel temperature of 370°C [1, 2]. While the ferroelectric polarization of bismuth ferrite is promising the antiferromagnetic response is problematic due to its effectively zero remanent magnetization and low magnetic susceptibility. According to the literature it has been shown that breaking this antiferromagnetic ordering has been achieved by substitution of the A-site of perovskite lattice with a rare eart element – gadolinium [3].
In this work local piezoelectric and magnetic properties of gadolinium modified bismuth ferrite (Bi0.88Gd0.12)FeO3 ceramics were investigated. Local measurements were performed using atomic force microscope (AFM) equipped with a piezo-response force microscopy (PFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) modes. PFM and MFM images show that the matrix possesses uncorrelated ferroelectric/ferroelastic and ferromagnetic domain structures, which indicates the multiferroic nature of (Bi0.88Gd0.12)FeO3. Furthermore, Fe-rich secondary phases are not piezoelectric, but are ferromagnetic, as indicated by their weak magnetic domain structure (Figure 1). To conclude, in this contribution the local piezoelectric and magnetic properties in correlation with microscopic properties of (Bi0.88Gd0.12)FeO3 ceramics will be discussed.

References:
[1] G. Catalan and J. F. Scott, “Physics and applications of bismuth ferrite,” Advanced Materials, vol. 21, no. 24. pp. 2463–2485, 2009.
[2] J. M. Moreau, C. Michel, R. Gerson and W. J. James, “Ferroelectric BiFeO3 X-ray and neutron diffraction study,” J. Phys. Chem. Solids, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 1315–1320, 1971.
[3] V. A. Khomchenko et al., “Effect of Gd substitution on the crystal structure and multiferroic properties of BiFeO3,” Acta Mater., vol. 57, no. 17, pp. 5137–5145, 2009.



Ključne reči: bismuth ferrite ceramics; gadolinium-modified bismuth ferrite ceramics; multiferroicity; atomic force microscopy; piezo-response force microscopy; magnetic force microscopy.

Tematska oblast: SIMPOZIJUM A - Nauka materije, kondenzovane materije i fizika čvrstog stanja

Datum: 04.08.2020.

Contemporary Materials 2020 - Savremeni Materijali


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